Brenda Fassie vs Madonna

Brenda Fassie vs MadonnaInterviewer: “So Brenda, I hear that you are the Madonna of the townships.”

Brenda Fassie: “No, no, no sweety, Madonna is the Brenda of America…” ????

Be inspired, give peace and share your smile with everyone. Have a nice weekend! Long live the spirit of Brenda Fassie, long live!

source: Neo Ntsoma, photographer

Brenda Nokuzola Fassie was born in 1964 in Langa, a township near Cape Town. She was named after the American country singer Brenda Lee. The daughter of a pianist, Brenda began singing to her mother’s accompaniment at a very young age, and already at the age of five, she had tourists paying to hear her sing. She already had her first band at this stage, the Tiny Tots. When she was about 16 years old, renowned producer Koloi Lebona came from Johannesburg to visit the Fassie’s Langa home after a number of Cape Town musicians had told him about Brenda. Lebona confirmed their high regard for the young Brenda, saying that her voice was very mature for her age and was ‘the voice of the future.’

Read her full bio on South African History website here

Brenda Fassie on Wikipedia:

Brenda Nokuzola Fassie (3 November 1964 – 9 May 2004) was a South African anti-apartheid Afropop singer. Affectionately called MaBrrr by her fans, she was sometimes described as the “Queen of African Pop” or the “Madonna of The Townships” or simply as The Black Madonna. Her bold stage antics earned a reputation for “outrageousness”. More on Wikipedia…

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Nothing good about Apartheid in South Africa

by Bobby Shabangu

There was absolutely nothing good about the apartheid system in South Africa at all.

I’m sitting here listening to a conversation between these old folks having apartheid nostalgia, praising the apartheid system for providing job opportunities to everyone. And literally arresting you if you are found to be not employed.

I’m sitting here thinking these old people are talking complete rubbish. Don’t they know that we, the younger generation read, and we have other old emancipated uncles who tell us detailed accounts of what was going on there.

I’m sitting here thinking, when are they going to mention that these jobs paid pittance! or that black people were not even allowed to study and do descent jobs like Engineering, Medicine, Aviation etc.

I’m sitting here thinking and anticipating if they will ever mention that before the National(ist) Party ( which I believe is known as DA these days, but that’s a topic for another day) gave you that degrading job, they had to humiliate you by stripping you naked. And as if you are a prisoner in your own country ( which you were), you had to squat and expose your genitalia to some fat white guy sitting behind a desk with a round face looking like an owl.

That owl would pull and fiddle with your penis, turn it around then look at you and say “it’s fine you are fit to work”. He probably used the same hand gloves to perform this sexual harassment on thousands of men desperate for menial jobs to support their families.

All this happened in corner Delvers and Albert str until the mid 80’s. That’s why I don’t use Delvers or Albert street anymore.

I’m sitting here thinking, all of a sudden these old people have amnesia, they have forgotten about what took place in the “Good old days of apartheid”.

God forbids, I didn’t live at that time, I would have been one of those killed and my body not found.

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“President” Clinton renamed ‘Nimkita

Hillary Clinton in Cape Town with Maite Mashabane
US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton (L) talks with South African Minister of International Relations and Co-operation Maite Mashabane. AFP PHOTO

The real task of the 21st century is to expand the “circle of opportunity”, US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton told delegates at a gala dinner in Pretoria on Tuesday.

“Freedom, democracy are great accomplishments of the 19th and 20th centuries. But now comes the hard part, how does democracy deliver?

“How does it make it possible for more and more people to enter that circle of opportunity to make lives better for themselves and their families?”

Clinton commended the work done by her South African counterpart Maite Nkoana-Mashabane in the past three years.

“We work together in order to produce results. Minister Mashabane is effective. She is effective, so grounded in the needs and aspirations of the people of South Africa,” she said.

“Having these jobs is not an end in itself… they are prestigious, they carry status, people drive you around, they protect you. But having a job is not the point, it’s using the job to make life better.”

After a record snow fall in the nine provinces, Clinton was named by the hosts as Nimkita – the one who brought the snow.

“Nimkita will be a name that I will proudly bear,” Clinton laughed.

Her business delegation has held talks over the last two days on strengthening trade and investment relations between the two countries. She announced a number of partnerships with South Africa in areas including education, small business development and the fight against HIV/Aids.

source: iAfrica

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South Africa is a land where people forgive

“South Africa is a land where people forgive.” Dr Credo Mutwa

Nelson Mandela and Desmond Tutu Forgiveness

South Africa has been fraught with a turbulent history. Following the dictates of the day, much needless suffering was inflicted on people.

Nelson Mandela underwent an enormous transformation, as did millions of South Africa’s citizens. Bishop Desmond Tutu initiated the Truth and Reconciliation Commission where people were given the opportunity to bare their souls.

Certain television programmes have encouraged people with painful histories and broken hearts, to forgive the misunderstandings that have marred their lives. Through these processes many hearts were healed.

When transformation takes place in the hearts of people that transformation ripples through the communities, and one by one, we, the people of this great country, link together to form unbreakable bonds. Never again will those who attempt to steer us in their chosen direction dictate us to.

South Africa is the land of forgiveness and together we are moving forward to embrace the magnificent future that lies before us.

For more articles by Linda Smith visit her website

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